Computer Aid launches Best Practice Guide to IT Decommissioning

Computer Aid has been working with independent research company Vanson Bourne to establish current IT decommissioning practices in the UK’s largest companies and we found that:

• 39 per cent of UK’s largest companies do not data wipe all their unwanted PCs

• One-third have decommissioned computers containing data which are unaccounted for

• 1 in 5 senior IT decision makers in the UK are “not confident” that zero per cent of their company’s unwanted IT goes to landfill

• Only 14 per cent follow best practice IT disposal and send their working IT for reuse

These statistics are shocking, particularly when one thinks of the scale of this problem. Each of the 100 companies surveyed are among the largest in the UK with half of the respondents employed in organisations with over 1,000 staff and the other half with over 3,000. Moreover, each company decommissions just under 550 PCs each per year.


With so much IT unaccounted for, sent to landfill or still containing data – it is clear that significant improvements in IT decommissioning has to occur not only to meet basic regulatory and security requirements but also to minimize the damaging impacts e-waste can have on the environment. An estimated 75 per cent of e-waste generated in the EU, equivalent to eight million tonnes a year, is unaccounted for – either sent to landfill, substandard treatment facilities or illegally exported. The toxins in PCs (lead, mercury and arsenic to name just a few) can be damaging to health and the environment and we cannot allow companies in the UK to continue contributing to this damage.

To help IT managers improve their decommissioning procedures, Computer Aid have today launched a Best Practice Guide to IT Disposal – click here to download a free copy. We hope that this information will help companies meet current regulatory requirements around e-waste and improve the environmental and reputational impact of their IT disposal strategies.

 

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